A Closer Look Inside

With the side covers removed we can get a good look inside the case.  The layout is a standard ATX format with all the drive bays located down the front and the power supply at the top-rear.

 

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All of the drive bays are fitted with slots for mounting the various drives with the provided screws. No drive rails or vibration mounts are provided for any of the drive bays.  As mentioned earlier, there is room for four internal 3.5′ hard drives, for a total of six if you don’t use a FDD or card reader in the two upper 3.5′ exposed bays.

 

Cable management is good inside the Praetorian 730 as all of the cables can be routed down behind the right side of the drive bays and are long enough to reach most any motherboard connector.  The three case fans come with 3-pin connectors and one 3-pin to 4-pin adapter is supplied for the front fan.

 

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All of the I/O cables and control wiring come with clearly labeled connectors to assist in attaching them to the motherboard headers and are a good length for the case.

 

I test mounted a full size ATX motherboard and power supply without problems.  The removable motherboard tray is very popular among many enthusiasts and the 730’s is one of the sturdiest I have seen. 

 

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The two rear Cooler Master labeled fans are rated for: 2,100 rpm, 27 CFM, 1.4W and incorporate sleeve bearings for quiet operation (23 dBA).  These fans are quieter than the front fan.

 

Cooler Master uses threaded standoffs to securely mount the motherboard to the chassis.  The power supply, motherboard and AGP/PCI cards lined up perfectly in their respective openings.

 

The Praetorian 730 uses standard thumb screws to secure expansion cards in their slots. 

 

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