Case Cooling

The Armor Jr. enclosure comes with two 120mm case fans installed — one in the front panel blowing into the case and one on the rear panel blowing out. 

 

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  1

 

Both of the Thermaltake labeled fans are rated for 1,300 rpm at 12V and are relatively quiet but not silent (36.2 dBA measured 3′ from the front of the case with the side panel on and a background noise level of ~30 dBA).

 

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  2

 

 

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  3

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  4

 

 

As you can see in the previous pictures, the stamped case fan grills are the open honey comb style that is minimally restrictive to airflow, especially at the lower (quiet) fan speeds. 

 

For additional airflow and case cooling, an optional 92mm fan can be added to the right side panel to blow cool room air onto the central motherboard area (CPU, video cards, memory, etc).

 

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  5

 

With the HDD cage mounted up in the BTX location, an optional 120mm fan can be used to draw air in thru the front of the case and over the HDDs.

 

Thermaltake Armor Jr. Mid Tower Case - Cases and Cooling  6

 

·         Thermaltake Case Fans

 

One notable difference between the original Armor enclosure and the smaller Armor Jr. is the lack of any ventilation holes on top of the case.  This shouldn’t be a big deal for most users but might preclude the use of a fan-less power supply and other fan-less coolers that rely on natural convection cooling thru the top of the case.

 

All of these options provide a lot of flexibility for various degrees of case cooling depending on each particular user’s combination of parts and objectives for balancing overall airflow and noise.

 

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