Installation

For this review, I will be using an AMD Athlon 64 CPU with the stock AMD K8 retention bracket.  The CPU IHS and heatsink base were cleaned with Isopropyl alcohol before applying a small amount of Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound and installing the heatsink. 

 

Installation on my test system was very straight forward.  The K8 clips engage only the center lug and lock into place with a small toggle lever.  As is frequently the case with AMD systems, one catch to positioning the Infinity on a K8/AM2 motherboard is how your particular motherboard is laid out.  The orientation of the Infinity CPU cooler is pre-defined by the position of the heat pipes and alignment of the retention frame holes on the motherboard.  This isn’t a problem when using the square LGA775 mounting system.

 

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On my test bed (Asus K8N-E Deluxe), the Infinity cleared all of the surrounding components — except the extra tall Corsair Pro memory modules.  However, there appears to be just enough clearance when using standard height memory.  

 

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I mounted the fan so that it pulled air thru the heatsink.  This orientation works especially well on K8 platforms (and LGA775) if you have a power supply with a bottom mounted fan.  The warm exhaust air from the CPU heatsink gets sucked right into the power supply and exhausted out the back of the case.  This approach would probably not work with the majority of P4 478 systems because the CPU socket is typically located near the top edge of the board.

 

Note: Scythe is in the process of compiling a list of compatible motherboards so you can check the Scythe website to see if your motherboard is compatible with the Infinity.

 

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(From the Scythe-USA website)

 

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