A Detailed Look (Cont’d)

Removing the PSU cover provides another view of the two fans along with all the other components inside the Galaxy 1kW power supply.

 

Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 38

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Here are a couple more pictures showing the internal layout.  All of the components are mounted on one printed circuit board, which contributes somewhat to the Galaxy’s relatively large (long) size.

 

Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 39

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Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 40

(click to enlarge)

 

 

Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 41

(click to enlarge)

 

One of the Galaxy’s more unique features is the fact that it uses two secondary sections, each with its own transformer.  (Actually there are three secondary sections, with three transformers, but since most all ATX power supplies use a separate section and transformer for the +5VSB output, we won’t count that.)  Using two smaller transformers instead of one big one offers several advantages (size, cost, CPU power isolated from other peripherals, separate +3.3V and +5V outputs, etc). 

 

From the various descriptions and tables provided in the Enermax literature, we can infer that the two +12V CPU outputs (+12V1 and +12V2) and the +5V output share one transformer while the remaining +12V outputs (+12V3, +12V4, and +12V5) along with the +3.3V output share the second.  In this configuration, the overall maximum load is approximately divided between the two transformers (T1~560W, T2~590W).

 

Five +12V outputs

 

The following table shows the maximum rated current and what connectors are supplied by each of the five 12V outputs (+12V1, +12V2, +12V3, +12V4 and +12V5).

 

Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 42

 

Note: The maximum combined load for all five +12V outputs is 75A (900 watts).

 

Enermax claims the Galaxy 1,000 watt PSU is capable of powering up to four, quad-core CPUs, four video cards, and 24 drives at the same time.  I don’t have anything in the test lab that requires that much power, but out of curiosity, I did use it to power my hottest test system.  This rig includes a Pentium Extreme Edition dual core 955 CPU, (2) Corsair CM2X512-8000UL DDR RAM, and two nVIDIA 7800GTX 512 MB video cards.

 

Enermax Galaxy 1000W / 1 kW Power Supply Review - Cases and Cooling 43  

 

With one dual-core CPU, two video cards in SLI, and 2 HDDs in RAID 0, I recorded the following measurements.

 

System idle (sitting at Windows XP desktop)        223 watts AC

CPU full load (CPUBurn x 2)                               296 watts AC

GPU full load (3DMark06 in SLI)                          387 watts AC

 

If we use an 80% conversion efficiency at the highest load (387 watts AC x .80 = 310 watts DC), this results in a maximum DC load of 310 watts, which isn’t even 1/3 of the Galaxy 1kW power supply’s rated capacity.  I think it’s safe to say, this power supply has more than enough reserve capacity to power a very extreme PC!

 

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