A Detailed Look – the Inside
Removing the left side panel provides a good view inside the GS1000 full-tower enclosure.   

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 (click to enlarge images)

Looking up into the motherboard area you can see the two 120mm exhaust fans on the top and rear panel.  It would have been nice if Zalman had populated both the top fan openings instead of just one (especially at this price point).  As we will see later, the HDD bays rely on the exhaust fans to draw cool outside air in through the front of the case for airflow.

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There are a total of 7 expansion slots and each slot cover is held in place with a thumb screw.  I personally prefer dedicated screws to secure the various expansion cards instead of the often cheesy, tool-less retention mechanisms that are sometimes provided.  The motherboard tray uses standoffs and includes mounting holes for standard ATX, Extended-ATX, and micro-ATX form factors.

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The power supply is designed to mount in the bottom of the chassis, which helps keep the case’s center of gravity low for better stability.  Note the bottom intake air opening directly under the PSU location.  This allows a power supply with a bottom intake fan to pull cool outside room air directly into the PSU and then exhaust it out the back of the case.

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There are four exposed 5.25” drive bays located down the front of the GS1000 enclosure.  The lower two bays come fitted 3.5” drive adapters, which can be positioned wherever you like and used for additional HDDs or external 3.5” devices.  At the bottom are two HDD cages that hold up to three 3.5” HDDs each.

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The lower HDD cage is fitted with a printed circuit board at the back that allows hot-swapping HDDs in the bottom three bays.  Note: Both the motherboard and HDD must support the hot-swap feature as well as remembering to “eject” a drive via the OS prior to removal.  Each HDD plugs into connectors on the front of the board and additional connectors on the back of the board allow attaching power and data cables.

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Removing the right side panel provides access to the right side of the drive bays and for routing cables and wiring.


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