SiSoft Sandra 2010a Results
    The performance of motherboards in traditional CPU workloads rarely vary by a few percentage points, mainly due to the memory controller being integrated onto the CPU by both AMD and Intel.  I used SiSoft to check for consistency here, as well as use the File System benchmark to get a good idea where we sit on SATA performance.

AMD 890GX Chipset Review - SATA 6G goes native - Motherboards 27

AMD 890GX Chipset Review - SATA 6G goes native - Motherboards 28

    Just as expected, the CPU performs the same with the two boards.  Memory bandwidth is a bit off on the 890GX, but this will likely be improved upon with further BIOS optimizations as the board matures.  Now onto the interesting stuff.

AMD 890GX Chipset Review - SATA 6G goes native - Motherboards 29

AMD 890GX Chipset Review - SATA 6G goes native - Motherboards 30

    This is grim.  The SB750, while improved from the previous SB600, is still not a fire breather when it comes to I/O performance.  The Intel and NVIDIA SATA controllers are often a lot faster, and this new SATA 6G cannot adequately compete with the older SATA 2 controller in the SB750.  I do not know if this is a question of drivers.  I switched over to the standard MS AHCI 1.0 driver, and performance actually decreased from what we saw with the AMD AHCI driver.

    This is still a very new board, and performance may improve with later BIOS and driver revisions.  Still, it is more than a bit disappointing to see such a decrease in overall performance from what is supposed to be the hot new SATA 6G controller.  Also, as mentioned, I do not have a SATA 6G native storage device to test out at this time.  Results could change dramatically, but it still is not a great development that SATA 2 performance is lower with the newer product.

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