IOMeter – Average Transaction Time (rev 1)

Back with the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB review, I revised the layout of these graphs to better show SSD latency and access time.  First, I have removed HDD results as they throw the scale too far to tell any meaningful difference in the SSD’s you are trying to focus on.  Second, I have reduced the queue depth scale down to 4.  In practical terms of a running OS, queue depth is how many commands are ‘stacked up’ on the SSD at that time.  An SSD is so fast at servicing requests that typical use will rarely see it increasing past 4.  In the cases where it does, there is so much going on that you are more concerned with IOPS and throughput at that point than transaction time.  The below charts are meant to show how nimble a given SSD is.  Think of it as how well a car handles as opposed to how fast it can go.

Some notes for interpreting results:

  • Times measured at QD=1 can serve as a more ‘real’ value of seek time.
  • A ‘flatter’ line means that drive will scale better and ramp up its IOPS when hit with multiple requests simultaneously.   


SandForce Roundup! Corsair Force F100 vs. OCZ Vertex 2 vs. OCZ Agility 2 - Storage 35

SandForce Roundup! Corsair Force F100 vs. OCZ Vertex 2 vs. OCZ Agility 2 - Storage 36

SandForce Roundup! Corsair Force F100 vs. OCZ Vertex 2 vs. OCZ Agility 2 - Storage 37

SandForce Roundup! Corsair Force F100 vs. OCZ Vertex 2 vs. OCZ Agility 2 - Storage 38

Access times were all very low, save the now aging original Vertex.  With such high write speeds, SandForce units are the absolute best at smooth, stutter free writes.
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