EPOS Sennheiser GSP 300 Wired Gaming Headset Review

Manufacturer: EPOS | Sennheiser EPOS Sennheiser GSP 300 Wired Gaming Headset Review

EPOS | Sennheiser’s GSP 300 is a wired gaming headset using a traditional 3.5 mm analog connection, which makes it pretty much universally compatible with PCs, game consoles, and phones (well, real phones anyhow).

Compared to the GSP 370 headset we looked at in April, the GSP 300 offers similar styling and features, but without the former’s wireless capability – and with a much lower price. At the time of this writing it is offered for $99, half the price of the GSP 370.

Does it sound the same as the GSP 370? I can offer a subjective assessment of that aspect, and we will cover build quality and comfort in this review as well.

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Features (via EPOS | Sennheiser):

  • Perfected sound quality with improved bass performance and acoustic clarity
  • Superior comfort and fit due to split headband
  • Noise-cancelling microphone
  • High-quality materials for long-lasting durability
  • Intuitive volume control on right ear cup for on-the-fly adjustments
  • Automatic microphone mute by raising the boomarm
  • Memory foam ear pads for the best-in-class acoustic seal and comfort
  • 2-year international warranty
  • PCV 05 Combo Audio Adaptor – for compatibility with Mac, PS4 & consoles with 3.5 mm jack input
Product Specifications

General Info

  • Model: GSP 300
  • Color: Black, Blue
  • Ear coupling: Circum-aural
  • Transducer principle: Dynamic, closed
  • Cable length: 2 m
  • Connector plugs: 2 x 3.5 mm / 1 x 3.5 mm (PCV 05 Combo Audio Adaptor)
  • Compatibility: PC, Mac, PS4 & consoles with 3.5 mm jack input
  • Headset Weight: 290 g
  • Warranty: 2 years

Headphones

  • Frequency response: 15–26,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 19 Ω
  • Sound pressure level: 113 dB
  • Total harmonic distortion (THD): 1%

Microphone

  • Frequency response: 10–15,000 Hz
  • Pick-up pattern: Noise-cancelling
  • Sensitivity: -41 dBV/PA
Pricing

99.95 USD

Manufacturer Description

“The GSP 300 is the ultimate upgrade for those wanting to take their gaming to the next level: Gaming headset with ultra-comfortable memory foam ear pads ensure best-in class acoustic insulation, while its noise-canceling microphone minimizes background noise for clearer team communication. Get ready for some serious fun.”

Packaging and Contents

The headset is well protected within the box by a plastic shell. The contents are simply the headset, the PCV 05 combo adapter (a Y-cable that allows the headset’s headphone and mic inputs to connect to a single headset jack), and some paperwork with warnings about safety, etc.

Design and Comfort

In general the GSP 300 looks identical to the previously reviewed GSP 370, other than the color scheme (dark gray and blue this time), though some aspects of its construction differ.

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The key points of the GSP 300’s design make it a very comfortable headset; with soft ear pads, a wide split headband design, moderate clamping force, and light overall weight. The cord is also of generous length at 2 meters (about 6.5 feet), and the 3.5 mm connectors seem to be of good quality.

Naturally, as this is an analog headset there is no onboard DAC or amplifier, and no battery. Still, the wireless GSP 370 was actually 5 grams lighter than this GSP 300 model (285g vs. 290g).

The volume control is integrated into the outside of the right ear cup, just as it was on the GSP 370 headset. This is a large knob that is easy to find and use when wearing the headset. The only other control is hidden, as the mic is automatically muted when the boom is raised more than half way.

The ear pad covers are the only thing that feels different between the GSP 370 and this GSP 300, as these are a leather-like vinyl throughout and do not have the velvet-like upper surface we saw with the GSP 370.

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The main difference is a lack of any moisture wicking, and in the hot summer months (or if you perspire to any significant degree) you will want to wipe these down after extended use.

Overall I have zero complaints about the construction and comfort of this headset. I find this series to be exceptionally well designed based on the two models I have now tested, and the GSP 300 looks and feels quite “high-end”.

Usage Impressions

Right off the bat I’ll say that these do not sound the same as the GSP 370. This GSP 300 headset has more prominent bass, and a bit of a “scooped” sound – where the midrange is a little less prominent. The result is a sound signature that is often favored, with the so-called “smile” EQ that I’ve mentioned quite a bit over the years.

But these observations are subjective, and I don’t have the equipment to produce any accurate frequency response graphs. What I think will be immediately apparent upon first listen is that they offer deep bass and good overall fidelity, though you will find better clarity and a more detailed (and balanced) overall sound if you were to move up to the GSP 370 headset.

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Put another way, the GSP 300 has a “warm” sound, with less brightness and more bass. In comparison the GSP 370 has more of a “flat” sound with less prominent bass. The latter is more accurate, the former is more “fun”. In short, the GSP 300 sounds like a very good gaming headset, and not like a pair of critical listening headphones.

Another aspect of the sound with this GSP 300 headset is the noise isolation, which is excellent. Both of the GSP headsets I have tested isolate very well, with the soft pad completely surrounding my ears and blocking out a surprising amount of background noise without any active noise cancellation.

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And speaking of noise isolation, the boom mic seems identical to that of the GSP 370, and offers good clarity and background noise rejection. It still sounds like a headset mic, but it’s just fine.

Conclusion

If you are in the market for a gaming headset and willing to spend up to $99, the GSP 300 offers very good sound quality and enough bass to provide real impact from game soundtracks and modern music. A closed-back design with excellent isolation, this headset also helps block out the outside world, and reduces the likelihood of disturbing those around you.

Beyond perceived sound quality, which is of course subjective, the build and comfort of the GSP 300 are both outstanding. These feel very well made, and the soft ear cushions, moderate clamping force, split headband, and light weight (just over 10 oz) make them great for longer gaming sessions.

Bottom line, the GSP 300 is a very well made product, and it will be hard to beat in this category for under $100. The “warm” sound signature and more pronounced bass compared to the GSP 370 will likely be preferred by many users, and if you can use a wired headset with your setup it’s a standout option that is easy to recommend.

EPOS Sennheiser GSP 300 Wired Gaming Headset: $99, Amazon

Review Disclosures

This disclosure statement covers the way the product being reviewed was obtained and the relationship between the product's manufacturer and PC Perspective.

How Product Was Obtained

The headset is on loan from EPOS / Sennheiser for the purpose of this review.

What Happens To Product After Review

The headset remains the property of EPOS / Sennheiser but will be on extended loan to PC Perspective for the purpose of future testing and product comparisons.

Company Involvement

EPOS / Sennheiser provided the product sample and technical brief to PC Perspective but had no control over the content of the review and was not consulted prior to publication.

PC Perspective Compensation

Neither PC Perspective nor any of its staff were paid or compensated in any way by EPOS / Sennheiser for this review.

Advertising Disclosure

EPOS / Sennheiser has not purchased advertising at PC Perspective during the past twelve months.

Affiliate Links

This article contains affiliate links to online retailers. PC Perspective may receive compensation for purchases made through those links.

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About The Author

Sebastian Peak

Editor-in-Chief at PC Perspective. Writer of computer stuff, vintage PC nerd, and full-time dad. Still in search of the perfect smartphone. In his nonexistent spare time Sebastian's hobbies include hi-fi audio, guitars, and road bikes. Currently investigating time travel.

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